Thursday, October 16, 2014

Paper Works at Art Dept.

Art Dept., an intimate gallery in Fishtown, sets the scene for Paper Works, this year’s PCB member exhibition. Members, friends, and passers-by filled the space on Oct. 3. Wine and hors d’oeuvres in hand, they examined artist books, prints, and paper sculptures in a wide variety of styles and media, reflecting the artistic diversity of PCB.

Some examples: accordion books in a number of forms; a tunnel book featuring a group portrait of ladies in old hats, extending back into the distant past; a complex story told in a series of fold-out pages gathered in a binder.

On the walls: an origami hanging, evocative photographs of travels in China and Uganda; a fascinating piece spanning a corner, in which prints of wood grain morphs into lines alluding to those of a topographical map; several shelves filled with different-sized boxes offset printed with doors and windows, suggestive of the rhythms of row-house Philadelphia.

These are only a few of the works on display. Paper Works showcases the versatility of paper and the multiple forms of printing used to transfer words and images onto it--not to mention the talents of PCB members. Paper Works is definitely worth a visit.

Paper Works
until Nov. 3, 2014
1638 E. Berks St.
Philadelphia PA 19125

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Artists Working Group

The PCB Artists Working Group met on Sunday, Sep. 28. Donna Globus, Susan Viguers, and I got together in Mt. Airy to show/talk about what we've been up to and share problems and solutions. 

Donna showed us the Guild of Book Workers' collaborative project on the theme of maps. She'd brought her contribution, a map of Monday morning, to the last meeting, and it was intriguing to see how the group's comments influenced the final product.
Susan gave us an update on her long-term project, The Opossum. Discussions at the last meeting brought about some changes to the title page, and we enjoyed seeing some reader's spreads with the art in place.
One of the pieces I brought was a modified snake book, which evolved over a number of Working Group sessions. All of the comments and suggestions--whether I accepted them or not--made it better.
There's nothing like a second--or third, or fourth--pair of eyes when you're working on a project. The Artists Working Group is a great way to get feedback in a relaxed, collegial setting. It's also stimulating to see and react to what others are doing. 
The more the merrier. If you're interested, contact Susan Viguers at